The healing power of forgiveness

Certain people deemed "unworthy" of forgiveness such as murderers, rapists, ex-spouses, parents, bad children, etc. No person is innately bad. What they have are deep, unhealed wounds and so do the rest of us.

The healing power of forgiveness

Even thinking about that witch of a co-worker is upsetting—and there she is, flaunting herself like a diva on American Idol. You find yourself daydreaming about ways to get even. How many of us are prepared to forgive a backstabbing colleague, an unfaithful partner, neglectful parents or even the rude jerk who hogged the treadmill this morning?

Persistent unforgiveness is part of human nature—but it also appears to work to the terrible detriment of our health. Learn why forgiveness helps your health and what you need to do in order to forgive. In study after study, results indicate that people who are forgiving tend to have not only less stress but also better relationships, fewer general health problems and lower incidences of the most serious illnesses—including depression, heart disease, stroke and cancer.

The latest research findings suggest that forgiveness works in several ways.

The healing power of forgiveness

One is by reducing the stress of unforgiveness—a toxic mixture of anger, bitterness, hatred, resentment and fear of being humiliated or hurt again.

These negative emotions have specific physical consequences, including increased blood pressure, adrenaline and cortisol levels, which have been linked to cardiovascular disease, immune suppression and, possibly, impaired neurological function and memory.

A second way forgiveness works is more subtle, as shown in studies indicating that people with strong social networks—friends, neighbors and family— tend to be healthier than loners. According to psychologists, someone who is angry and remembers every slight is likely to lose relationships during the course of a lifetime, while people who are forgiving are more likely to attract and keep a strong social support system—to the benefit of their own health.

But how do you learn to forgive, when holding a grudge feels so right? What can you do to suffer less? One, you can decide to disentangle yourself from your overconnection to this person. And two, you can move past it and get a life.

Then try to look beyond your personal experience and, ultimately, make the choice to let go of the weight and stress of your anger for your own benefit. Universally, researchers agree that forgiveness does not mean condoning, excusing, forgetting or denying an offense.

It also does not have to involve reconciliation or putting yourself back into an abusive relationship. If someone vandalizes your car, you can forgive the culprit—but you can also seek payment for the repair bill or pursue justice through the courts. Steps to Forgiveness To make forgiveness part of your life, follow these expert guidelines: Decide to do whatever you have to do to feel better.

Forgiveness is for you, not for anyone else. Get the frustration out. Tell your story to a few close friends. This will help you explore your feelings and obtain a clearer sense of perspective. Practice focusing on the good and positive things in your life: Try to recognize goodness, niceness and kindness, and thank people often.

Develop the mind-body technique for deep, slow breathing. Use it immediately to help calm and refocus yourself whenever a painful memory or the sight of someone hurtful upsets you. Instead of mentally replaying the hurts over and over, focus on your own positive goals.

For example, for one person this might mean getting past anger at a parent for an abusive childhood to instead concentrating on personal goals of becoming fitter and learning to be a better parent oneself.

Start with small things. Focus on facts rather than emotions. Try not to take things personally. It helps to recognize that, says Luskin. Forgive those you love. According to Luskin, grievance stories for long-past offenses too often become roadblocks that stop us from moving forward.

The most important people to forgive are those close to us. You might not be ready to forgive someone today, but if you were, what would it sound like? Practice saying it out loud to yourself when you are alone.

Then when you are ready to forgive, it is available to you. Further educate yourself about forgiveness. Check local colleges, churches or hospitals for classes or workshops, plus libraries or the Internet for further reading. Forgiving can free you to move on with your life. After all, living well is the best revenge.I wish to speak on the healing power of forgiveness.

In the beautiful hills of Pennsylvania, a devout group of Christian people live a simple life without automobiles, electricity, or modern machinery. My dear brothers and sisters and friends, I come before you humbly and prayerfully. I wish to speak on the healing power of forgiveness.

The Healing Power of Forgiveness - James E. Faust

In the beautiful hills of Pennsylvania, a devout group of Christian people live a simple life without automobiles, electricity, or modern machinery. Holding Grudges Eats Away at You. The fact of the matter is that forgiveness is a two-way street.

It has the power to heal the forgiver just as much as the one being forgiven − .

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As we age, things that we’ve done—or that were done to us—carry tremendous emotional weight. Let them go. Holding Grudges Eats Away at You. The fact of the matter is that forgiveness is a two-way street. It has the power to heal the forgiver just as much as the one being forgiven − something that many of us often forget.

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The healing power of forgiveness

Few Christians realize nearly every problem in life stems from an unwillingness to forgive someone. When we hold grudges5/5(17).

The Healing Power of Forgiveness - James E. Faust