Gangs in the prisons

From drug and weapon trafficking to extortion, intimidation, and murder, these gangs still control criminal empires, despite being behind bars, and prison authorities can feel powerless to stop them.

Gangs in the prisons

Origins[ edit ] The convict code and informal governance of prisons[ edit ] Before the rise of large, formal prison gangs, political scientists and researchers found that inmates had already organized around an understood "code" or set of norms. For example, political scientist Gresham Sykes in The Society of Captives, a study based on the New Jersey State Prison, claims that "conformity to, or deviation from, the inmate code is the major basis for classifying and describing the social relations of prisoners".

The code may include an understanding of jail yard territory based on rank or ethnicity, or it could simply be loyalty between inmates and against guards.

Sykes writes that an inmate may "bind himself to his fellow captives with ties of mutual aid, loyalty, affection, and respect, firmly standing in opposition to the officials.

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Rising prison populations and the emergence of formal gangs[ edit ] When researchers or political scientists actively discuss "classic prison gangs", they are referring to prison gangs in the United States of America;[ citation needed ] such gangs began to form in the mid s.

The constant surge of prisoners coming into the system with no understanding of the status quo had disrupted the established equilibrium cohesion.

And as demographics inside prisons changed drastically, small groups centered on ethnicity, race, and pre-prison alliances were disrupted.

John Irwin states in his book, Prisons in Turmoil, that by "there [was] no longer a single, overarching convict culture".

Several challenges arose that destabilized the socio-political system of self-enforced cooperation that had existed under the convict code. These new conditions posed complications to consumer-supplier relationships in the already distrustful environment of an underground economy.

It became more and more difficult for independent individual suppliers to accommodate this increased demand. Under tight prison security and with limited means, these individual suppliers could only provide a limited amount of product.

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Their consumer base was too small for them to establish a " brand " or credibility themselves. New consumers would have to buy products of unknown quality and bear the risk of the supplier being an undercover informant and even the possibility that he would not deliver at all.

Individual suppliers had to protect themselves from possible murder and assault by consumers and other suppliers, as well as to ensure that their products would not be confiscated or stolen. They were vulnerable to those who delivered and carried the contraband into the prison, and they bore the risk of consumers not paying for the product, or if operating on credit not paying the loan.

The consumers could also be informants. In legal markets, governments mitigate such risks by means of contract enforcement and the upholding of property rights. Gangs may step into this role and fill the power vacuum. Prison gangs are effective in governing markets.

They provide protection to their member suppliers more effectively than individual suppliers could do for themselves. They carry the credible threat of exercising violence - and even murder in case of theft or snitching - to ensure timely payments.

Gangs in the prisons

They protect their members against competing suppliers.BACK. Nothing to Hide. Hello world! This is Greg. I've brought you "The So-called Game" and a few other writings here on "Gangs and At-Risk Kids.". Gates of Injustice: The Crisis in America's Prisons [Alan Elsner] on caninariojana.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Gates of Injustice is an extraordinarily compelling expose of the American prison system now completely updated in this new paperback editon: how more than 2. From physical abuse and disease to severe overcrowding and gang violence, the following five terrifying pits of chaos and despair are the worst prisons in the world.

NUESTRA FAMILIA The bones of La Nuestra Familia (NF) originated in September with the initial name “La Familia” at the Deuel Vocational Institution in Tracy, California.

The gang’s initiators then changed the organizations name to “La Nuestra Familia” on September at the Northern California’s Soledad Correction Training Facility. Inmate News Latest news, organized by topic (below) or region/state (right), concerning a range of issues in the corrections industry.

Comments, suggestions and contributions (below) appreciated. "Gang Prevention and Schools" by Richard Ramos is a must-read for those who are seeking to understand the root causes of gang violence and find solutions to help our youth avoid entering into this distructive lifestyle.

The Numbers Gang - Wikipedia