An introduction to the analysis of transpersonal paradigm

The German branch of critical psychology predates and has developed largely separately from the rest of the field.

An introduction to the analysis of transpersonal paradigm

An introduction to the analysis of transpersonal paradigm

The Challenge of Environmental Ethics Suppose putting out natural fires, culling feral animals or destroying some individual members of overpopulated indigenous species is necessary for the protection of the integrity of a certain ecosystem.

Will these actions be morally permissible or even required? Is it morally acceptable for farmers in non-industrial countries to practise slash and burn techniques to clear areas for agriculture?

Consider a mining company which has performed open pit mining in some previously unspoiled area. Does the company have a moral obligation to restore the landform and surface ecology? And what is the value of a humanly restored environment compared with the originally natural environment?

If that is wrong, is it simply because a sustainable environment is essential to present and future human well-being? These are among the questions investigated by environmental ethics. Some of them are specific questions faced by individuals in particular circumstances, while others are more global questions faced by groups and communities.

Yet others are more abstract questions concerning the value and moral standing of the natural environment and its non-human components. The former is the value of things as means to further some other ends, whereas the latter is the value of things as ends in themselves regardless of whether they are also useful as means to other ends.

For instance, certain fruits have instrumental value for bats who feed on them, since feeding on the fruits is a means to survival for the bats.

However, it is not widely agreed that fruits have value as ends in themselves. We can likewise think of a person who teaches others as having instrumental value for those who want to acquire knowledge. Yet, in addition to any such value, it is normally said that a person, as a person, has intrinsic value, i.

For another example, a certain wild plant may have instrumental value because it provides the ingredients for some medicine or as an aesthetic object for human observers.

But if the plant also has some value in itself independently of its prospects for furthering some other ends such as human health, or the pleasure from aesthetic experience, then the plant also has intrinsic value.

Many traditional western ethical perspectives, however, are anthropocentric or human-centered in that either they assign intrinsic value to human beings alone i.

Transpersonal Psychology: The Role of the Afrocentric Paradigm - Linda J. Myers,

For example, Aristotle Politics, Bk. Generally, anthropocentric positions find it problematic to articulate what is wrong with the cruel treatment of non-human animals, except to the extent that such treatment may lead to bad consequences for human beings.

From this standpoint, cruelty towards non-human animals would be instrumentally, rather than intrinsically, wrong. Likewise, anthropocentrism often recognizes some non-intrinsic wrongness of anthropogenic i.

Such destruction might damage the well-being of human beings now and in the future, since our well-being is essentially dependent on a sustainable environment see Passmore ; Bookchin ; Norton et al. When environmental ethics emerged as a new sub-discipline of philosophy in the early s, it did so by posing a challenge to traditional anthropocentrism.

In the first place, it questioned the assumed moral superiority of human beings to members of other species on earth. In the second place, it investigated the possibility of rational arguments for assigning intrinsic value to the natural environment and its non-human contents.

It should be noted, however, that some theorists working in the field see no need to develop new, non-anthropocentric theories. Instead, they advocate what may be called enlightened anthropocentrism or, perhaps more appropriately called, prudential anthropocentrism.

Briefly, this is the view that all the moral duties we have towards the environment are derived from our direct duties to its human inhabitants. Enlightened anthropocentrism, they argue, is sufficient for that practical purpose, and perhaps even more effective in delivering pragmatic outcomes, in terms of policy-making, than non-anthropocentric theories given the theoretical burden on the latter to provide sound arguments for its more radical view that the non-human environment has intrinsic value cf.

Nortonde ShalitLight and Katz Furthermore, some prudential anthropocentrists may hold what might be called cynical anthropocentrism, which says that we have a higher-level anthropocentric reason to be non-anthropocentric in our day-to-day thinking.

Suppose that a day-to-day non-anthropocentrist tends to act more benignly towards the non-human environment on which human well-being depends.

Structural functionalism - Wikipedia

This would provide reason for encouraging non-anthropocentric thinking, even to those who find the idea of non-anthropocentric intrinsic value hard to swallow.Most recent additions to this Reading Room; Frank Visser, 'Spiritual Science' is a Contradiction in Terms, Response to Steve Taylor, November David Lane, Understanding Matter, Why a Spiritual Perspective Needs Science to Make Sense of the World, November Steve Taylor, Beyond Materialism, Why science needs a spiritual perspective to make sense of the world, November TRANSPERSONAL THEORY AND CLINICAL PRACTICE Such examples give some indication of how transpersonal theory may enhance diagnostic thinking regarding psychosis: it can provide ways of differentiating between regressive (pre-egoic) psychosis and transpersonal phenomena.

in relation to one’s ordinary.

An introduction to the analysis of transpersonal paradigm

One of the Greatest Treasures of Humanity lies deftly hidden in the heart of the Human Brain. The Treasure is not Material. It is a Gateway - a gateway leading to our deepest origins that is activated when the pineal gland secretes a hormone similar to melatonin.

Transpersonal Psychology aims to investigate the transpersonal in a scientific and scholarly way, while also recognising the importance of a commitment to transpersonal ideals such as empathy, compassion, personal-development and wisdom. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY INTERACTIVE Readings in Educational Psychology.

Developed by: W. Huitt Last updated: November Environmental ethics is the discipline in philosophy that studies the moral relationship of human beings to, and also the value and moral status of, the environment and its non-human contents.

Educational Psychology Interactive: Readings in Educational Psychology Discussion of the aim of education is a function of the philosophy of education or 'educational theory'.
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Transpersonal psychology - Wikipedia He was the second child of Hiram Mead d. George Herbert's older sister, Alice, was born in
Frequently bought together Definition[ edit ] Lajoie and Shapiro [8] reviewed forty definitions of transpersonal psychology that had appeared in academic literature over the period from to
Environmental Ethics (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)